Facilitating the protection and restoration of endangered species and ecological communities on BC’s South Coast

South Coast and BC Guidelines

Guidelines & Best Practices

A number of guidelines around best practices for conservation and recovery have been developed for species at risk, rare plants and ecological communities on the South Coast and BC. A selection is provided here that provide relevant applications to South Coast species and ecological communities (some are not found through senior agency sites).

For the most up to date information regarding guidelines and regulatory requirements for various species and ecological communities at risk in BC, please contact the relevant staff with the Province of BC, Species at Risk Program of the Ecosystems Management Branch, Environment Canada, Pacific Region or the Department of Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Pacific Region. Further information can be found on our CONTACT page. 

 

These frogs breed in wetlands and ponds in the spring.The tadpoles grow quickly, changing to adult form duringthe summer. Once they finish breeding, the adults leavethe wetlands and travel long distances through uplandand riparian forests. They are loyal to their homes andwill return to natal wetlands even if...
The Phantom Orchid (or Ghost Orchid) is an unusualplant that obtains its nutrients from a fungus ratherthan through sunlight and photosynthesis. The PhantomOrchid has a three-way partnership with a specificfamily of fungi (theThelophoraceae) and a (presently unidentified) tree species. Both the stem and...
The Rocky Mountain Tailed Frog and Pacific (Coastal)Tailed Frog are the only members of the family Ascaphidae and are considered to be the most primitivefrogs in the world. These species get their names from the male frog’s distinctive “tail” which is used for internal fertilization during mating....
The Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) earns its name through its stout body, wide wedge-shaped head, and fleshy legs. Adults can reach totallengths of up to 30–35 cm! Like many other amphibians,the skin of Coastal Giant Salamanders is sensitive topollution, ultra-violet radiation and drought....
Mountain Beavers are actually not beavers, but a primitive rodent found in the Fraser Valley and the southern Cascade Mountains of British Columbia. Theyget their name from their habit of cutting small limbs off trees, although they also feed on herbaceous plants, ferns, and shrubs. Mountain Beavers are...
The Pacific Water Shrew (Sorex bendirii) has velvet-like dark brown to black fur with a dark brown tail and is also known as the Marsh Shrew. These shrews are excellent swimmers; air bubbles trapped by the fringe of hairs on their feet provide enough buoyancy to enable them to run on the surface of...

The Ministry of Environment, with the Pacific Water Shrew Recovery Team, has developed this document to provide planners, developers, and consultants with information about the Pacific Water Shrew, and guidelines on how to include Pacific Water Shrew in environmental assessments. This document suggests actions that municipalities, regional districts...

Guidance on Coastal Tailed Frog Monitoring of Run-of-River Hydropower Projects: The Ministry of Forest, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNR) is currently in the process of implementing a collaborative study to monitor tailed frog tadpoles and habitat conditions at several facilities in the South Coast, using a Before-After-...

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