Facilitating the protection and restoration of species and ecosystems at risk on BC’s South Coast

For First Nations

Species at Risk Conservation in Canada could not be successful without recognizing and integrating the perspectives and knowledge of Indigenous communities. SARA recognizes this explicitly by embedding a commitment to First Nations collaboration in the Act's preamble stating that “…the traditional knowledge of the aboriginal peoples of Canada should be considered in the assessment of which species may be at risk and in developing and implementing recovery measures.”

The SCCP recognizes this responsibility as part of its own work and continues to seek collaborative opportunities that respect and support the inclusion of experiences, wisdom and perspectives of the numerous Coast Salish communities of the South Coast. Sharing resources developed with, for and by First Nations on BC's South Coast is an evolving process that we seek to grow over time.

Below you will find a range of website and downloadable resources utilized and or developed by the SCCP, First Nations and various project partners over time. Content for resources developed by the SCCP and First Nations partners has been either commissioned or is used with exclusive permission.

We welcome website suggestions or resources!

 

 

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources: As a national First Nation directed environmental non-profit organization, our mission is to work in partnership with Indigenous nations to support and build sustainable Indigenous communities and a healthy environment. 

 

 

 

First Voices: A suite of web-based tools and services designed to support Indigenous people engaged in language archiving, language teaching and culture revitalization. The South Coast is represented by two major language groups with a number of distinct dialects The most common language is Halq'eméylem (Halkomelem), a Coast Salish language with a number of dialects spoken by communities found in the Metro Vancouver/Fraser Valley/Howe Sound and Sunshine Coast regions. The second language is Ucwalmícwts, an Interior Salish language spoken by the Lil̓wat7úl (Líl̓wat) Nation of the interior coast mountains (Pemberton-Whistler).  

 

Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk: The Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk (AFSAR), established in 2004-2005, supports the development of Indigenous capacity to participate actively in the implementation of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The protection of species at risk in Canada depends upon a meaningful collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and organizations. 
 
Coast Salish Species Mosaic Artwork by Mark Gauti. Used with permission. For further information about Mark and his artwork see: https://www.facebook.com/art.trickster/
RESOURCES
Oral traditions have been instrumental in forming and maintaining the foundation of Stó:lō/Coast Salish society. There has always been value in acknowledging the connection that elders have with their children and grandchildren, to experience the sharing of historical understanding through story, uniting past and present. Sharing history through oral society means expressing one's world view, which is a comprehensive, diverse perspective that balances the physical, spiritual and intellectual worlds. World view translates to a living knowledge of resources that reflects thousands of years of observation and connection. Prepared for the SCCP by Carrielynn Victor, an artist of Coast Salish and European ancestry. "Her First Nations roots are from the village of Cheam, Pilalt Tribe, of the Stó:lō Nation (“people of the river”). Carrielynn’s ancestral name is Xemontalot (KHum-un-ta-lot). This name ties her to the land and the people in the upper Fraser Valley. Through her visual artistry, Carrielynn brings traditional Stó:lō values to the subject of endangered species."
Developed in partnership between the Naut'sa mawt Tribal Council, South Coast Conservation Program and Tsawwassen First Nation Construction / Matcon Civil Joint Venture. The partnership was created through federal funding in 2015 to provide opportunities for shared knowledge, skills development and networking on species at risk conservation, invasive species management and long-term ecosystem recovery approaches for First Nations on the South Coast. Artwork by Mark Gauti T'Sou-ke First Nation, with content written by Pamela Zevit (SCCP) and editing by Nicci Bergunder (TFN Construction / Matcon Civil Joint Venture). Mark Gauti has worked for many years as both an environmental scientist and Coast Salish artists on projects that combine art and science. "This booklet is meant as a guide for First Nations people who live in the Lower Fraser area to learn about and possibly identify some of the species at risk. It is important For First Nation people and environmental non-profit organizations to work together to identify, track and document these species as well as raise awareness about the issues surrounding why they are at risk in the first place."
A key goal of the Katzie Eco-cultural Restoration Project is to re-introduce native plants, like wapato, to Katzie territory, and in doing so revitalize traditional harvesting practices to bring back these plants for food, medicine, and materials. The Katzie are working to engage the whole community in this effort, including youth and Elders.
In April 2010 the AFN appeared before the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development to make a submission on the legislated five year review of the Species At Risk Act. The analysis and recommendations made regarding the policy suite reflect the recommendations made before the standing committee.
This Toolkit will assist you and your community through the SARA listing process and how it can impact your community or how your community can use SARA to protect species.
The Métis National Council convened a National Environment Committee meeting in March 2011 for the five Governing Members of the Métis Nation: Métis Nation of Ontario, Manitoba Metis Federation, Métis Nation - Saskatchewan, Métis Nation of Alberta, and the Métis Nation British Columbia to discuss a broad range of environmental issues facing the Homeland. The Committee, chaired by President Clément Chartier who is also Minister of Environment for the Métis National Council, is working with Environment Canada to ensure Métis involvement in assessment, protection, recovery planning, implementation plus monitoring & evaluation processes.
Focus on Boreal Woodland Caribou, and by Fisheries and Oceans Canada in Regard to the Inner Bay of Fundy Atlantic Salmon and American Eel; and Identification of Gaps and Suggestions to Increase the Level of Aboriginal Participation in the Species at Risk Act. Prepared by: Maritime Aboriginal Peoples Council
‘Holistic Approaches to Environmental Management’ Goal #1. Increase First Nations’ SAR awareness and knowledge Goal #2. Increase First Nations’ involvement in SARA process (consultations and stewardship) Prepared by: Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER)
This document is a resource guide for building and fostering better local government- First Nation relations. Metro Vancouver’s Profile of First Nations provides Metro Vancouver, its Board, committees, and the public with information on neighbouring First Nations and First Nations outside Metro Vancouver that have interests within the region.
get female viagra fast